Davide La Rocca / 13K ( Part 1 )
May 12, 2017 - Jun 30, 2017


 
  Sandra Ackermann / Lost in Nothingness
Mar 24, 2017 - May 06, 2017





 
  Claudia Rogge / CONCENTRATION
Jan 27, 2017 - Mar 18, 2017


 
  Christmas-Holidays: Dec 24, 2016 - Jan. 7, 2017
Dec 20, 2016 - Dec 20, 2016


 
  Christian Bazant - Hegemark / The Rise and Fall of Transformative Hopes and Expectations
Nov 11, 2016 - Jan 21, 2017


 
  Harding Meyer / The Others
Aug 26, 2016 - Nov 05, 2016


 
  Crossing Borders
Jun 03, 2016 - Jul 15, 2016


 
  Sandra Senn / Flüchtiges Getriebe
Apr 08, 2016 - May 21, 2016


 
  Iwajla Klinke / Red Sandals and a Mirror for Gabriel
Feb 12, 2016 - Mar 26, 2016


 
  Corrado Zeni / Éloge de la fuite
Nov 27, 2015 - Jan 09, 2016


 
  Claudia Rogge / PerSe
Oct 16, 2015 - Nov 21, 2015


 
  Kate Waters // Tell it like it is
Aug 28, 2015 - Oct 10, 2015


 
  Visions Of Sensory Space ( by Weightless Artists Association - SPARTNIC )
May 15, 2015 - Jul 04, 2015


 
  Sandra Ackermann / Wasteland
Mar 13, 2015 - May 02, 2015


 
  Lost Scapes
Jan 30, 2015 - Mar 07, 2015


 
  Christian Bazant-Hegemark / Calibrating Aesthetics
Nov 14, 2014 - Jan 17, 2015


 
  Frank Bauer / Back to Basics
Aug 29, 2014 - Nov 08, 2014


 
  Harding Meyer // recent paintings
May 23, 2014 - Aug 23, 2014


 
  Till Freiwald - memoria
Apr 11, 2014 - May 17, 2014


 
  Quadriennale Düsseldorf 2014 / Gallery Evening
Apr 05, 2014 - Apr 05, 2014


 
  Iwajla Klinke / Ritual Memories
Jan 17, 2014 - Apr 05, 2014


 
  Giacomo Costa // Traces
Nov 22, 2013 - Jan 11, 2013


 
  DC-Open Galleries: Matthias Danberg - Inventory by Appropriation
Sepr 06, 2013 - Nov 16, 2013


 
  Christian Bazant-Hegemark // VOW OF SILENCE
May 24, 2013 - Aug 20, 2013


 
  Corrado Zeni // Generation Why
Apr 12, 2013 - May 18, 2013


 
  behind the Non-Colours
Mar 22, 2013 - Apr 06, 2013


 
  Sandra Ackermann // Running to stand still
Feb 15, 2013 - Mar 16, 2013


 
  Düsseldorf Photo Weekend 2013
Feb 01, 2013 - Feb 09, 2013


 
  Mihoko Ogaki // Star Tales - White Floating
Nov 30, 2012 - Jan 31, 2013


 
  Claudia Rogge / Lost in Paradise
Oct 12, 2012 - Nov 24, 2012


 
  Harding Meyer // features
Sepr 07, 2012 - Oct 06, 2012


 
  Summer 2012 - Part 2
Aug 10, 2012 - Sepr 01, 2012


 
  Summer 2012
Jul 06, 2012 - Sepr 01, 2012


 
  Maria Friberg // The Painting Series
May 11, 2012 - Jun 23, 2012


 
  Mary A. Kelly // Father & Child
Mar 30, 2012 - May 06, 2012


 
  Maia Naveriani // Future Wolves and Chicks so far
Feb 10, 2012 - Mar 24, 2012


 
  Düsseldorf Photo Weekend 2012
Feb 04, 2012 - Feb 08, 2012


 
  Kate Waters // The Air that I breathe
Dec 09, 2011 - Jan 28, 2012


 
  Frank Bauer / ...den Wald vor lauter Bäumen....
Nov 04, 2011 - Dec 03, 2011


 
  Claudia Rogge // Final Friday
Sepr 09, 2011 - Oct 29, 2011


 
  Davide La Rocca - STILLS
May 27, 2011 - Jul 16, 2011


 
  Giacomo Costa // Post Natural
Apr 01, 2011 - May 21, 2011


 
  Harding Meyer - to be a real vision
Feb 18, 2011 - Mar 26, 2011


 
  Shannon Rankin - Disperse / Displace
Dec 03, 2010 - Feb 12, 2011


 
  Sandra Ackermann // I look inside you
Oct 15, 2010 - Nov 27, 2010


 
  Amparo Sard / AT THE IMPASSE
Sepr 03, 2010 - Oct 09, 2010


 
  Kate Waters // The Land of Kubla Khan
Jun 11, 2010 - Jul 17, 2010


 
  Jurriaan Molenaar // Lessness
Apr 30, 2010 - Jun 05, 2010


 
  Claudia Rogge // The Paradise of the Onlooker
Mar 05, 2010 - Apr 24, 2010


 
  Ivonne Thein // incredible me
Jan 22, 2010 - Feb 27, 2010


 
  Frank Bauer // Jet Set
Nov 27, 2009 - Jan 15, 2010


 
  Michael Koch // forever more
Oct 23, 2009 - Nov 21, 2009


 
  Masaharu Sato // SIGNS
Sepr 04, 2009 - Oct 17, 2009


 
  Harding Meyer // blind date
Jun 19, 2009 - Aug 22, 2009


 
  Maria Friberg // way ahead
Apr 24, 2009 - Jun 13, 2009


 
  Claudia Rogge // Isolation ( aus: Segment 8 - die Blasen der Gesellschaft)
Mar 06, 2009 - Apr 18, 2009


 
  Claudia Rogge - The Opening
Mar 06, 2009 - Apr 18, 2009


 
  JoJo Tillmann // What you see is what you get
Jan 30, 2009 - Feb 28, 2009


 
  Sandra Ackermann // Die Wirklichkeit ist nicht die Wahrheit
Nov 21, 2008 - Jan 24, 2009


 
  Kate Waters - Getting used to the 21st Century
Oct 10, 2008 - Nov 15, 2008


 
  Mihoko Ogaki - Milky Ways
Sepr 04, 2008 - Oct 04, 2008


 
  Summer 2008 // Painting
Aug 12, 2008 - Aug 30, 2008


 
  Silke Rehberg: Stationen 1,4,6,7,11,12,13,14
Jun 13, 2008 - Jul 12, 2008


 
  Maia Naveriani: At home with good ideas
May 09, 2008 - Jun 07, 2008


 
  Justin Richel: Rise and Fall
Apr 04, 2008 - May 03, 2008


 
  Davide La Rocca - Strange Object
Feb 08, 2008 - Mar 28, 2008


 
  Frank Bauer: AkikoAlinaAlinkaAndrew....
Nov 30, 2007 - Feb 02, 2008


 
  Maria Friberg: Fallout
Oct 12, 2007 - Nov 24, 2007


 
  Harding Meyer / in sight
Sepr 06, 2007 - Oct 11, 2007


 
  SUMMER '07
Jul 17, 2007 - Sepr 01, 2007


 
  Kay Kaul - Wasserfarben
Jun 15, 2007 - Jul 14, 2007


 
  Sandra Ackermann - Point Blank
Mar 02, 2007 - Apr 28, 2007


 
  Tamara K.E.: pioneers -none of us and somewhere else
Jan 19, 2007 - Feb 24, 2007


 
  Till Freiwald
Nov 17, 2006 - Jan 13, 2007


 
  Claudia Rogge: U N I F O R M
Sepr 01, 2006 - Nov 11, 2006


 
  Frank Sämmer: Die Stunde des Zaunkönigs
Jun 23, 2006 - Aug 22, 2006


 
  Kate Waters: Killing Time
May 05, 2006 - Jun 17, 2006


 
  Katia Bourdarel: The Flesh of Fairy Tales
Mar 31, 2006 - Apr 29, 2006


 
  Mihoko Ogaki
Feb 10, 2006 - Mar 18, 2006


 
  Silke Rehberg: RICOMINCIARE DAL CORPO
Jan 27, 2006 - Feb 26, 2006


 
  Sandra Ackermann
Dec 08, 2005 - Jan 15, 2006


 
  Corrado Zeni
Dec 04, 2005 - Jan 11, 2006


 
  Frank Bauer
Nov 18, 2005 - Jan 15, 2006


 
  Harding Meyer
Oct 07, 2005 - Nov 12, 2005


 
  AUFTAKT
Sepr 02, 2005 - Oct 01, 2005


 
  Claudia Rogge: Rapport
Jun 17, 2005 - Jul 20, 2005


 
 
May 13, 2005 - Jun 11, 2005


 
  Kate Waters: Solo-Exhibition in the Gallery Thomas Cohn, Sao Paulo
Apr 16, 2005 - May 20, 2005


 
  Vittorio Gui: FROZEN MOMENTS
Apr 08, 2005 - May 07, 2005


 
  Kay Kaul - ARTSCAPES
Apr 03, 2005 - May 29, 2005


 
  SEO Geheimnisvoller Blick
Mar 04, 2005 - Apr 02, 2005


 
  Claudia van Koolwijk at Museum Bochum
Feb 26, 2005 - Apr 17, 2005


 
  Corrado Zeni - Six Degrees of Separation
Nov 26, 2004 - Jan 15, 2005


 
  Maia Naveriani: What' s the difference between ME and YOU?
Oct 15, 2004 - Nov 20, 2004


 
  Tamara K.E.: MAD DONNA AND DONNA CORLEONE
Sepr 03, 2004 - Oct 09, 2004


 
  Davide La Rocca: Real Vision Reflex
Jun 12, 2004 - Jul 17, 2004


 
  Kay Kaul COLLECTORSCAPES
Apr 23, 2004 - Jun 05, 2004


 
  Frank Sämmer MUTABOR
Mar 12, 2004 - Apr 17, 2004


 
 
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Harding Meyer / in sight
Sepr 06, 2007 - Oct 11, 2007



weitere Bilder:
1 2 3

With a group of new paintings in the exhibition in sight, Harding Meyer continues his intensive pursuit of the artistic rendering of the human face. The subtle differences in the artistic realisation of each single motif are indicative of this intensive preoccupation. The single images, which were worked out over weeks and months, are consistent within themselves. In direct comparison, they reveal their - in every way - multi-layered origin. The faces which serve as the basis of most of Harding Meyer´s paintings, are originarily taken from the media. Catalogues and magazines, movies and television are the pool from which the painter serves himself. The original images rarely boast an artistic composition in themselves; rather, they are anonymous mass goods. Out of this flood of images Harding Meyer isolates the faces - which is in itself already a significant act. The face, which like no other part of the body conveys the individuality of a person, is brought back from mass medial use into a context of individual impact. In this moment of decontextualisation the faces carry the traces of their medial origin, which may even intensify through the particular way in which Harding Meyer captures them. The digital cameras and analogue videocams which he uses to capture moving images reinforce the characteristics of technical imaging systems. An image taken from television often has horizontal lines due to the interlaced method, the field-by-field build-up of the television image. Computer images on the other hand have a pixel structure, and even printed samples are not completely homogeneous. In addition there are artefacts which are created by the cameras as well as the painter´s conscious manipulations of the image structure. Harding Meyer purposefully works with these changes of the image samples when he transfers them onto canvas. In this transfer onto one of his standard canvas formats, the faces are given one decisive common trait: the compositional cut. In the majority of cases the slightly horizontally oriented paintings show the faces from the forehead down to just below the chin. This approach gives the paintings an unmistakable stylistic coherence. Moreover, and this is more decisive, the faces seem close up. This closeness produces an intimacy which may easily lead to speculations about the psychological condition. With regard to the tradition of portrait painting, to which Harding Meyer´s work can be related, it is often remarked that the horizontal orientation is unusual while the vertical is the rule. Indeed, the vertical corresponds much more to the shape of the head. However, it does not correspond to the human gaze, for the level position of the eyes establishes a horizontal field of vision. The gaze as constituent of interpersonal dialogue, even from a distance and even between strangers, may be seen as relevant for images of faces on the whole.

The abovementioned closeness and individuality are the result not only of this compositional intervention, of the cut, but also of the artistic process to which Harding Meyer submits not only the motifs but also himself. The layered structure is common to all pictures, but the abovementioned characteristics of the Vorbilder are not neutralised as with many other painters. Instead, they affect each respective paint application with brush and palette-knife. The pictures are therefore not only distinguishable by the respective motif but also by the flow.
Although this technique leads to nuanced differentiations in the painting surface, this approach creates a likeness which is observed mostly in portrait photography. In portrait photography there is a close connection between model and photographer, which is established via the gaze. In the finished portrait, the photographer not only leaves his trace in the form of a technical handwriting: one can discern a similarity of expression in the faces of different persons photographed by the same artist. It is not so much with the camera but with the photographer that a relationship develops in the act of photography, and the empathetic relation of model to photographer is mirrored in the facial expression of the portrayed. This effect, which can be relatively easily observed in portrait photography, is generally applicable. The mirroring of facial expressions is a phenomenon which can be observed between all empathetic people. It is at the first moment involuntary, but not accidental. Already in infancy this reciprocity is established via mimic expressions, which not only express but also alter psychological states. The classical example of such reciprocity is a child´s smile which infects the people near it. In this phase also, the ability to recognise a person is developed. The early, visually formative experience is the constant closeness of faces, the mother´s as well as that of other relatives, for example by being carried around in somebody´s arms.
Each time, during the long process of creative production, Harding Meyer brings his own empathy to the image samples adopted by him. When comparing the samples with the final paintings, a slight change of expression can be discerned which is owed to the weeklong gaze of the artist into the face on the canvas.

Harding Meyer´s Vorbilder stem from, as mentioned, mostly anonymous photography which for intended use, such as in fashion, resorts to stereotypical formulas and shapes. Within their context of use, the purpose is quickly recognised and the model, but also the actor, are visible as carriers of a role and its image. With their appearance, the conventionally beautiful models of advertising and fashion remain subject to this function. Harding Meyer dissolves this functional context and, through painting, facilitates access to this beauty. Other than the ugly, the beautiful is, from the perspective of cultural critique, always under general suspicion of manipulative impact, thus per se to be regarded as seeming more than being. From this point of view the images of faces in the paintings of Harding Meyer seem almost provocative, since they no less negate the possibility of beauty as his paintings negate the possibility of painting. This sounds paradoxical, however it refers to the historical situation which looked for the pure expression to the exclusion of the material world in the means alone, utilised painting to illustrate theories or merely suffered it as an ironic commentary on the end of art.

The new paintings of Harding Meyer build constellations among each other, with the larger-than-life faces of pictures of smaller format and the almost overwhelmingly large faces of adults.
Two of these paintings deserve to be singled out in this context. One of these two paintings shows a youth leaning on a wall in a room aligning towards the back. It is not only the room that distinguishes this painting from the other paintings, which do not offer a contextual hint at their surroundings. If the faces are not originally extreme close-ups or if they have a neutral background, Harding Meyer removes the details. However, in this painting the room and the otherwise invisible body from the neck downwards are present: only the head is missing and therefore the face! This missing head is thought-provoking when a painter is otherwise so intensively preoccupied with the face. The picture could be seen as an experiment which underlines the significance of head and face for the identification of a human figure, even if physique, gestures and posture do take characteristic forms in different people and thus allow conclusions. Also the painting reminds us that in the first place it is not about the motif but about a visible conflict in painting. But with regard to the near impossibility of identifying the young man in this not unusual but strange room, it has to be said that the faces in the other paintings also remain the faces of strangers, and the lack of titles serves this purpose. Even if single faces can be identified as those of famous actors, this does not mean that the person is being recognised. Eventually the portraits of famous persons, though in some cases even characteristic, join the community of the nameless who embrace the names among them with their anonymity and, as it were, include them in their collective.
One title, or rather a name, leads to the second painting that breaks ranks. This painting has a title: Dieter. Why does the painting have a title, who is Dieter, and is Dieter´s name really Dieter? All these are banal but important questions, and basically here, too, just like in the case of the headless young man, the identity is in question. Would the viewers really know more about the faces, respectively the persons behind them, if they were given names? Names and titles can be meaningful and meaning-giving additions. On the other hand they always bear the risk of simply banning the unknown in the magical act of naming, and losing sight of the essential point - that one does not really know who the other is and that the other can only lead a liveable existence if he can indefinitely change instead of being the same person all the time. Part of leaving things open in this way is to over and over obtain a new picture of the other and to take a lot of time for this process, in particular when using canvas and oil paint. And these are ready for being encountered and seen in the exhibition of Harding Meyer - therefore in sight.

Thomas W. Kuhn




./ Participating Artists


Harding Meyer